Weather Around the World Picture | Weather Around the World

posted on 04 Sep 2014 10:13 by wrygroup2021


Weather Around the World



Clara Lahti runs to catch up with her family during a walk along a pond in the warm spring weather in Clarence, N.Y., Wednesday, May 23, 2012.

David Duprey/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



An Indian man cools himself by splashing water from pipe on a hot summer day in Allahabad, India, Sunday, May 27, 2012. The weather in northern India has been extremely hot in recent days with temperatures reaching as high as 45 degrees Celsius, or 113 degrees Fahrenheit.

Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



A boy slides down in to a swimming pool as the sun shines in the northern German city of Hameln on May 22, 2012 as temperatures rose to up to 30 degrees Celsius.

JULIAN STRATENSCHULTE/AFP/GettyImages

Weather Around the World



Roselyn DeJesus, left, and her sister Joselyn, from Jacksonville, N.C., cover their eyes from the sun while laying in water at the beach with their grandfather Brian Wilcox, from Auburn, Ind., at Surf City, N.C., in this May 21, 2012 photo.

Don Bryan, The Jacksonville Daily News/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



The sun sets as a haze of smoke from burning fires lingers in the air just a few kilometers west of Timmins, Ontario, Canada, on Friday, May 25, 2012.

Nathan Denette, The Canadian Press/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



This photo provided by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources shows a wildfire in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The fire grew by 17 percent to more than 21,000 acres Saturday, May 26, 2012, as officials warned of tough conditions and welcomed help from water-dumping aircraft from the Michigan National Guard.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



This photo provided by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources shows a wildfire in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The fire grew by 17 percent to more than 21,000 acres Saturday, May 26, 2012, as officials warned of tough conditions and welcomed help from water-dumping aircraft from the Michigan National Guard.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



A Pakistani family struggles to walk in a dust storm in Islamabad on May 25, 2012. Dust storms are common in this month which are locally called Andhi.

FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/GettyImages

Weather Around the World



This photo taken Thursday, May 24, 2012 shows a tornado touching down near Cornlea, Neb. The tornado struck a farm house causing extensive damage. The farmstead sits about two miles west and a mile north of the Platte County village of Cornlea.

Nick Brichacek/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



Campbell Miller looks over the wreckage of the Grand Fresniere Presbyterian church in Saint Benoit, Quebec, Canada on Saturday, May 26, 2012 after a tornado struck the area.

Ryan Remiorz, The Canadian Press/AP Photo

Weather Around the World



Armando Fernandez gasses up a waste water pump as he dries out of a flooded parking lot in an office park, Wednesday, May 23, 2012 in Doral, Fla. According to the National Weather Service, a flood watch for portions of the South Florida area was in effect till later Wednesday night due to heavy rains Tuesday and more expected rains in the afternoon.

Wilfredo Lee/(AP Photo

Weather Around the World



A couple of monkeys quenches their thirst as another takes a dip on a hot summer afternoon on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Friday, May 25, 2012.

Channi Anand/AP Photo

http://abcnews.go.com/US/photos/weather-world-16439746/image-16439833

Hurricane Arthur Weakens To Category 1 Storm

posted on 26 Jul 2014 10:39 by wrygroup2021


KILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. (AP) -- Proving far less damaging than feared, Hurricane Arthur left tens of thousands of people without power Friday in a swipe at North Carolina's dangerously exposed Outer Banks, then brought lousy Fourth of July beach weather to parts of the Northeast as it veered out to sea.

The weather along the narrow barrier islands -- where beaches draw hundreds of thousands of tourists every summer -- had already cleared by Friday afternoon as Arthur scooted north and its outer bands scraped the Delaware and New Jersey shores. Forecasters predicted the storm would weaken before its center moves over western Nova Scotia in Canada early Saturday.

While state and local officials worked to restore access to Hatteras Island and help those who had suffered storm and flooding damage, the effects of the hurricane were mostly confined to that part of the state. Farther south, the beaches were once again packed with people soaking up the sun.

"The North Carolina beaches are open for business and they're open for tourists," Gov. Pat McCrory said. "The umbrellas are going up as we speak right now."

Arthur struck North Carolina as a Category 2 storm with winds of 100 mph late Thursday, taking about five hours to move across the far eastern part of the state.

At the height of the storm, more than 40,000 people lost power, and the rush of water from the ocean on one side and the sound on the other side buckled part of North Carolina Highway 12 in a spot on Hatteras Island that was breached in Hurricane Irene in 2011. Dozens of workers were heading to fix the highway, and the Department of Transportation said it was confident the road would reopen Saturday as long as an underwater sonar test of a key bridge showed no problems.

No injuries or deaths were reported. After praising emergency officials and saying the state dodged a bullet, McCrory said he was heading to the beach himself for an Independence Day parade in Southport.

By Friday night, the hurricane had weakened to a Category 1 storm with 75 mph winds. Its center was about 75 miles (120 km) east-southeast of Chatham, Massachusetts.

While the Northeast wasn't expected to take a direct hit, the rain from Arthur's outer bands was disrupting the holiday. Rain from Hurricane Arthur disrupted some New York-area Independence Day celebrations but cleared in time for the nation's largest fireworks display in the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Tropical storm warnings were in effect for coastal areas as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Tropical storm watches and warnings were in effect for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in southeastern Canada.

Still, the first hurricane known to strike the U.S. on July 4 caused some frayed nerves on North Carolina's Outer Banks -- a 200-mile string of narrow barrier islands with about 57,000 permanent residents and around 250,000 visitors on most summer weekends. A mandatory evacuation was issued for the southern Outer Banks. But while most visitors left, many residents stayed, accustomed to hurricanes that strike the area on average about every four or five years.

Jesse and Carol Wray rode out the storm in their home in Salvo on North Carolina Highway 12. They said the island was under several feet of water at the height of the storm. The six-foot-tall lamppost at the end of their driveway was under water except for its top, and that was after the sound a quarter-mile away receded several feet.

"There's a lot of damage to a lot of houses around here," Wray said. "Everything flooded out. All the businesses are flooded, and there was a lot of wind damage."

The bulk of the flooding and other damage on Hatteras Island appeared to have happened in the island's midsection in the villages of Rodanthe and Salvo. Farther south in Buxton, Angela Tawes is eager for the road to reopen, the ferries to resume and tourists to return with their money.

"We're all just holding our breath and hoping right now," said Tawes, whose family owns a grocery store, Conner's Supermarket.

Arthur is the first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season. It is the earliest in the season a hurricane has made landfall in North Carolina.

McCrory said people in states to the northeast should need to warnings about Arthur, even if North Carolina came through better than expected.

"I encourage them to take this very seriously as we did and hope for the best results," the North Carolina governor said. "We've always felt that it was better to overreact than underreact, gladly this storm was more underwhelming than anticipated, which was very good news."

___

Associated Press writers Martha Waggoner in Raleigh, N.C, Skip Foreman in Charlotte, N.C., and Philip Marcelo in Boston contributed to this report.

___

Emery Dalesio can be reached at http://twitter.com/emerydalesio .

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20140704/arthur/?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=green


HOYLAKE, England (AP) -- Rory McIlroy looked as though he had just thrown a knockout punch at the British Open, and it was only Saturday.

When he rolled in a 10-foot eagle putt on the final hole for a 4-under 68, he straightened his back, stared defiantly at thousands of fans crammed into the horseshoe arena around the 18th green at Royal Liverpool and lightly pumped his fist.

He went from being tied for the lead to six shots ahead of Rickie Fowler in just over an hour.

And suddenly, the biggest challenge facing the 25-year-old from Northern Ireland was reminding himself that he had one more round left.

McIlroy can't afford to picture his name etched on the base of that silver claret jug. He can't think about what it will be like next April to drive down Magnolia Lane at Augusta National with a shot at becoming the sixth player to capture the career Grand Slam.

"I'm not taking anything for granted," McIlroy said.

He knows that from experience, good and bad. He blew a four-shot lead at the Masters in 2011 and shot 80 in the final round. He had an eight-shot lead at the U.S. Open two months later and set two scoring records to win by eight. And just two months ago, McIlroy came from seven shots behind to win by seven.

It looks like a lost cause for Fowler, Sergio Garcia and anyone else trying to chase down a guy who has won both his majors by eight shots. The six-shot lead was the largest at The Open since Tiger Woods led by six at St. Andrews in 2000.

Even so, McIlroy was doing his best to preach caution.

"A lot can happen," he said. "And I've been on the right side of it and I've been on the wrong side of it. You can't let yourself think forward. You've just got to completely stay in the moment, and that's what I'm going to try to do for all 18 holes tomorrow."

History is on his side.

No one has ever lost a six-shot lead in the 121 years that The Open has been contested over 72 holes. Boy Wonder would not seem to be a candidate.

"What you have with him is he's just so explosive," Jim Furyk said after a 71 left him 10 shots behind. "He won the U.S. Open by eight shots. He obviously doesn't have any issue as the front-runner, and has no issue trying to extend that lead, much like Tiger used to."

McIlroy was at 16-under 200.

"If I'm able to go out and get off to a good start, maybe I can put a little bit of pressure on him," Fowler said after a 68. "Because he's definitely in control of the golf tournament right now."

Fowler tried to do his part on a cloudy Saturday with occasional rain, but not nearly what the R&A expected when it went to a two-tee start of the first time in history. Fowler, who was six shots behind going into the third round, ran off three straight birdies to start the back nine and shared the lead when McIlroy made bogey on No. 12.

It all changed so quickly.

Fowler made a bogey on the 14th hole. McIlroy, playing in the group behind, drilled a 35-foot birdie putt that put his lead back to two shots.

"Rickie was just getting close to me," McIlroy said. "I could hear the cheers in front of me. I just wanted to get ahead. To hole a putt like that was huge."



And that's when he turned it on.

McIlroy blasted a drive on the par-5 16th hole and hit 4-iron from 252 yards over a pot bunker to the left side of the green and made a 15-foot eagle putt. That restored his lead to five shots, for Fowler had driven into a pot bunker and made a bogey.

Fowler recovered with a superb shot out of the pot bunker on the 18th to tap-in range for birdie. That put the American into the final group for the second straight major, both times a long way out of the lead. He trailed Martin Kaymer by five shots going into the last day of the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2.

Fowler didn't get closer than four shots from Kaymer in the final round.

Garcia, who played in final group with Woods at Royal Liverpool in 2006, certainly had his chances. He was only three shots behind at the turn until missing a short birdie putt on No. 12 and failing to convert so many other chances. Garcia had a 69 and was seven shots behind, along with Dustin Johnson (71).

"It's going to be difficult," Garcia said. "But we'll give it a shot."

This was Rory's show, just like it was at Congressional, just like it was at Kiawah Island when he won the 2012 PGA Championship.

And yet the biggest crowd belonged to Woods, the sport's biggest star who is playing his first major since back surgery four months ago. Woods narrowly made the cut on Friday, opened with two straight birdies and that was about all the excitement. He made another double bogey, another triple bogey and shot 73.

Woods was 19 shots out of the lead.



The biggest challenge for McIlroy might be to avoid looking ahead. It was hard. Asked what it would mean to be one major away from a Grand Slam at 25, McIlroy said, "It would mean a lot of hype going into Augusta next year."

"I'd be in pretty illustrious company," he said.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/19/rory-mcilroy-open-championship-third_n_5601445.html